The Language of Mattering

Hi y’all out there!

Again I came across an interesting post by Umair Haque (I guess you might think by now I’m following him or something) , here it is: He makes a point of finding out the meaning of our life or better: of allowing meaning to find us. And to be open to Love. Big love not small love. It seems we have become deaf to the language of mattering, numb to the real meaningful things (which most of the time aren’t things anyway) blind to the meaning of our life, closed off from a life with meaning. And why? Is it the overload of stimuli telling us to care about having stuff, to see the world around us in terms of stuff and stuff only? It must be why most people I know are dissatisfied, whether they are regarded successful or not.  Constantly living in a state of profound exhaustion, perpetually fuelled by fear. Fear of being hurt, disappointed, turned down, fear for showing up as who we really are, imbued by the fear of not being good enough. Well, if it helps, let me tell you: you are good enough just the way you are. We all are.

It takes courage to see and more so to embrace what our life is about. Too often we get caught up in a complex structure of rules and supposed expectations we think we need to fulfill. letting go of that feels like giving something up, without us being able to see how it holds us back, how it limits our talents, how it prevents us from living wholeheartedly. Freedom is more than just an academic notion, being born in a discussion to which none of the participants are really present. It comes from disciplined action based on self-knowledge and with detachment from the results. So the invitation is to go out there and get dented, bruised scratched in allowing meaning to find you. And in that process to love and be loved. Love yourself for starters and see what comes from that, see how different the world becomes when you do so. Have conversations that matter, with anyone that matters. We think we’re alone but once we dare to step out from under our glass dome, we quickly find out we’re not. Initiate these conversations, go out and seek the experiences that are meaningful to you and not necessarily to others. Experiences that bring you closer to who you are and what it is that you, and only you, are here for. All are craving for contact, for sharing experiences, for having conversations that matter. For being open to the language of mattering. Allow those conversations to happen so you can help others on their way as they help you continue your journey.

Love and Blessings,




Money and the illusion of separation

Drowning in never enough money


I talked about Charles Eisenstein and his book Sacred Economics in my previous blog ( Now, I’d like to address another phenomenon enhanced by money: separation. It starts with a view that everything in the universe which you don’t recognise as ‘you’ is separate and hence alien. At best you and it are indifferent about each other but chances are that you, as a human being, see it as something to be afraid of, something hostile. And that asks for control. But how can we control nature? We do impact it but can we control it? When you don’t feel part of the universe, part of nature, you may see it as things, or ‘a bunch of stuff’ as Charles Eisenstein labels it in this video ( It becomes a bunch of stuff you can get hold of, process it and then sell it back to the people to whom it belonged in the first place, leaving you with more money than before. And with that money you can buy stuff. I find it interesting that renting out storage space has become a market of its own, at least in the US and in several European countries. We buy so much stuff that we can no longer store it in our homes. I like to believe that most products we buy, are not bought because of their functional qualities but as a kind of sedation. An attempt to lift the loneliness and void our money driven lives have given us. Who was it that said: ‘the best things in life most of the time are not things?’. How can a bag cost several thousands of dollars or euros? And hold the stuff it’s supposed to hold indescribably better than a, let’s say two hundred dollar bag would? Of course I’m aware of the underlying psychological patterns of the buyers. But really: a 10cm square cm strip of leather with a Luis Vuitton ring to it should cost over a hundred euro’s? I’m wondering if anybody has researched the sustainability of the psychological well-being of a person as the result of owning exorbitantly expensive luxury goods, that can be produced at only a fraction more of what it costs to produce commodities. And commodities are what most of the things  are that we use in the first place. Or is there anyone out there believing he’s the only one with an iPhone? Of course I’m not saying we should move to a state controlled plan-economy where everything we can buy is of poor quality, not sufficient in quantity and as standard as it gets. The point is that I believe (and agree with Charles Eisenstein) that we have come to the point that we’re reaching the end of economic growth as we have been taught to have it. And hence a different, arguably far more limited role of money is required. I predict that the focus on human needs will grow. To experience meaningfulness, significance and hence get out of the money game. How much more stuff do we need to have in order to feel happy? Fulfilled? Satiated? What is finally enough? Of course the emerging economies around the world provide the last profitable stretches in this dead-end street. Indeed this was mentioned in my first novel (  I lost track of how much coca cola the average chinese is drinking, how much Cartier and Rolex watches they own  and how much Mercedes, Porsches, Beamers and Ferrari’s have been sold more to China than last year? More expensive stuff won’t fill the void. More expensive stuff doesn’t feel the rather basic human needs of wanting to feel fulfilled by deploying our talents where they’re needed and where they make sense. Naturally, without being forced to serve whose ever bottom line.

It is time we start seeing and experiencing the connection again. It is time we leave the money game behind us and enter the human game, which is played on a global scale with fairness and access to the planet’s richness for all. Charles Eisenstein refers to this as the coming of age ordeal. Now it’s time to individually and collectively reconnect to our purpose and direct the deployment of our unique talents exactly in that direction.

All love and blessings,


Preface ‘The Glass Dome’


Hey there!

Following some reactions on my previous blog, I thought it would good to publish the preface to my first novel ( So….here it is! Again: this is not about me knowing what is going on and what exactly is awaiting us. I’d like us to engage in a meaningful conversation as to what wants to manifest throught these horrible events like the Aurora shooting etc. and regarding what all of us could do to prevent that suffering from happening.



These are interesting times. As I’m writing this [August 2011], we’ve witnessed the Arab spring, which has far from settled down, the earthquake in Japan with its devastating effects, countries on the brink of bankruptcy, Europe struggling to prevent the Eurozone from collapsing, there was the Oslo carnage and just recently the riots in various UK cities. Something of a rather large order seems to be going on, inviting us to take a step back, take a different look at who we are and to make different ways of living, of treating ourselves, each other and the planet possible. Nothing remains the same and what is going on could very well only be the beginning of even bigger changes.


As change is becoming more radical and occurring yet faster it is impacting all around the planet. With traditional sources for providing guidance losing their authority and therewith their relevance we’re left to ourselves to try to make sense of what is going on and of what apparently wants to happen. In order to find a justification for these changes, and to try to make sense of them, most will refer to sources from within the current reality, whether it’s science, religion, whatever. I’m pretty sure that trying to find satisfactory explanations within the current paradigm is going to be a challenge. Let alone that adequate solutions for the current challenges, these ongoing changes impose on us, can be found. You cannot steer a ship by looking at its wake. Whatever the source, it seems clear to a growing number of people that something is profoundly changing on the planet. I’m one of them.


These upcoming changes will have an effect on how we look upon ourselves, our relationships, our work, our societies, our planet, in short: upon how we have shaped our world. We will be sailing uncharted waters and whatever we have developed as practices over the past millennia will only be of limited help in setting out our next course. Individually and collectively we need to be able to connect to and mobilise other sources in order to successfully continue on our journey of development.


The story in this book has been written for all of you out there who sense there is something more to their lives than that you have been taught (and have learned) to believe ever since you were kids. Somehow this longing for this unknown is getting stronger in many people. You may see yourself faced with the question whether or not to heed this call and bring forward changes in your life that may lead to a radical change in the way you have been living up until now. Whether or not you decide to engage in this transformation is solely up to you. And the story has no intention whatsoever to persuade you in doing so. But since this calling gets stronger for many, so does the anxiety. Both individually and collectively. Why venture a giant leap into something completely unknown at the risk of leaving behind everything you attached so much value to? Or at least had gotten used to? Why leave behind a seemingly fulfilling life, which you have gained by learning how to play the game, through adapting to the context, often at the expense of yourself ? Why can the heart be so sure about what direction to take and why does the mind so persistently convince you not to do such a foolish thing? What are actually the stories you are telling yourself about yourself, about your relationships, about your career, about success, about your life, about leadership, about politics, about the world in general and how things go? And how well are they serving you?


The main intention of this story is to make you feel more comfortable with whatever really wants to manifest through you, with which you know deep inside you are connected. But from which you somehow shield yourself off. That’s why I’ve chosen to illustrate the journey of one individual. Again, it may be helpful to know that you are not the only one having those feelings. There’s an increasing number of people around the planet having similar feelings and looking for ways to deal with them knowing that no single person holds all the answers. So, I wish you happy reading with an open mind and, more importantly, with an open heart.


All Love and Blessings,






A life without Self….

Good day!
Today I came across the announcement of Jack Stephen’s (twitter @organicjack) new book ‘Soul Self’ ( Here’s  part of the preface I checked out on Amazon:
“Although I experienced various successes in my life, they never seemed to last or bring a true sense of fulfillment. Like many people in modern society, I spent most of my life doing what I learned as a child – striving to please others, looking outside of my Self for direction and competing for recognition, affection and seemingly scarce resources. I let subconscious programs, unhealed trauma, and opinions of other people control my life. I learned about the power of positive thinking, but I mistakenly believed that a few minutes of constructive thought every now and then would overwrite the deeply buried, firmly ignored or resolutely avoided destructive thoughts, feelings and beliefs that were creating my reality 95% of the time. I could convincingly talk about positive, healthy living, but I could not yet match those words with my actions.
Knowing that we want to be happy, yet continuing to make choices that cause unhappiness is all too common, but I felt alone in my feelings of confusion, self-criticism and despair. I had a difficult time accepting that I was worthy or capable of experiencing health, wealth and true, loving partnership. I did my best to disguise my insecurities, and over time, I accepted that while I was neither a dismal failure nor a grand success, the life I was living was the best I could expect. In nearly every area of my life, I settled for less than I was capable of creating.”
I don’t know about you guys, but it strongly resonated with me. I recognise my life in what Jack wrote and I must say I’m looking forward to read his book as he is coming from experience rather than being a smart consultant. It left me pondering once more about our beliefs. About my beliefs… Again they prove to be so strong, even if we don’t recognise them and even if they live far below the surface of our conscious perception. Perhaps as a result of one or more experiences in our childhood. Like parents telling us to fit in. Teachers telling us to do as we’re told. Others telling us we can’t play along. Well, in my perception that’s exactly what all of society did when I grew up.  Today, I feel it leaves me on a journey of which I know I haven’t completed it yet. Over the last few years I’ve gained tremendous insights in who I am and what I’m here for. But I feel, I sense there’s still more to the story that will eventually really set me free and get all of my talents going. The score until now? OK, well. according to my clients I am an excellent executive/transformational coach. And I really love doing that work as I know it’s part of who I am. Last year I published my first novel ‘The Glass Dome’ ( and I’m writing my 2nd one (working title: Water Colours). It took a while (of actively fighting it) before I could accept that the novel wanted to manifest itself in my life…. (What do you mean: limiting stores I was telling myself and therewith blocking the flow of energy?) The third leg has to do with music. And actually, writing this, my thoughts go back to a meeting last week with an old-time friend with whom I hadn’t hung out for a long time. He mentioned that the first thing I told him when we first met (this goes back to 1982 or so) was that I rather wanted to have become a guitar player but had decided for studying economics in stead….. I must confess, that kind of hit home. The experience is similar to being called by my first boss ever following me inviting him for the book launch in Amsterdam last year november. Laughingly, he shared that it had been one of the first things I had told him: that I wanted to write a book. Oyyy…. so I guess I have become at least partially blind to that what wants to manifest in my life. And hence I got my portion of struggle.
Well, anyway…. as I said I’m still on my journey of discovery. With the biggest challenge finding ways to interact and engage with all of you out there. Somethign I find very hard to do. So if you have any insights or experiences you’d like to share….. I might have a few in return (but only if you want to)!
All love and blessings,

Invitation to co-create


Indeed, this is an invitation to co-create a novel. Last year my first novel ‘The Glass Dome’ was published ( ) and now I have started writing a sequel to it (working title: ‘Water Colours’. Initially it seemed to look like it was going offer the perspective of the main character’s wife on what turbulence her husband’s transformation caused. However, having started to write on it, it seemed to me it was going to be almost  a carbon copy of ‘The Glass Dome’. Of course, faced by the crisis of her husband leaving behind his career, Karen Woudenberg (now the main character) will go through a process of transformation herself as well, with similar resistance to embracing new insights as her husband struggled with. But somehow it’s clear to me that her transformation will go faster and deeper. And I feel I would like to explore more specifically the road ahead of us. I choose to believe that as mankind we’re at the start of enormous changes. The result of that would be a radically different global society. Although I have some ideas of how that would look like I would like to explore how the process towards that new society would look like.

What I’m requesting of you

  1. I’m inviting you to share your ideas about how the world will look when we have gone through this transformation.
  2. Tell me how this process will take place.

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I choose to believe that eventually the world is going to be one inclusive community (as opposed to a set of opposing exclusive communities that are frantically competing and fighting each other). Following a jump in our collective consciousness, resources are shared much, much more evenly than they are now. The rules of the game will have changed radically and will probably be less law-based but much more consciousness based. It will be a world where individuals celebrate their individual freedom (and accountability that comes with it), allowing others theirs. So it’s kind of living apart together 🙂 People will want to deploy their talents in flow for those meaningful causes for which they have been designed and they will experience fulfillment from that. How will survival be arranged? How do we maintain our health and education infrastructure? And indeed: what about our roads, bridges, airports, ports, energy? What will we be doing when acquiring as much material possessions as possible is no longer the main driver? Will it be a world without money? Will there be other ways of facilitating exchange?

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It looks like we’re heading for a series of crises that has only started to grow in intensity and severity and which are taking down our current system(s). Specifically I’m interested in your thoughts about the role of money in our economic system. It seems to me that we have banks creating money, which they lend out and expect to get more in return, what they are going to lend out again. Following Charles Eisenstein’s thoughts, our economy is debt and interest based which necessitates growth and leads to our society being monetized. We get to pay for everything, be it goods or services. States urge as many people as possible to engage in paid work as that increases their income. E.g. a mother staying at home, taking care of her family vs a mother, hiring a nanny, or buying a place at day care center for her toddlers, eating out or sending for meals yield different results. Currently the focus is on preferring the second option. However, by now it seems the possibilities for creating new services are close to being exhausted.  On a macro level, most states are having (severe) problems balancing their budgets. Countries  like Greece, Italy and Spain have so much debt that an increase in their interest rate is threatening their very existence. So it seems to me that a lot of instability is going to be around for a long while.

How does it (the process) work?

If and when you’re interested in contributing to the new novel send me a comment to this post or a mail ( When we get our little community together I would be in touch with all of you, sharing in more detail what I’m thinking of. My idea is to publish the book in an e-book format that people can download for a tweet or a like. Possibly a ‘regular’ publisher will pick it up later and will want to transform it into a real book. The idea behind all of this is to try to reach as many people as possible around the globe in order to allow them to become more aware of the big changes announcing themselves so that collective intelligence can start getting mobilised. Perhaps a small contribution can be made in making the transformation process a little less bumpy than it is now.

Technically, we’d probably get started on Google docs or something similar. Or perhaps I’d collect and distribute the work in progress via Dropbox. Let’s just see what works best for us.


Why co-creation?

OK, so this is not about me suffering writer’s block 🙂 I think co-creation is the manifestation process of the future, in which those who want to and are able to contribute. I would expect the result to be better (defined in whatever way) than when somebody tries to figure out stuff on his own.

What’s in it for you?

First of all a great experience of co-creating a story that will be read by I don’t know how many people around the globe and thus contribute to the unavoidable transformation. You will be mentioned in the foreword as co-creator and the book will have a list of all of you (including your contact details and website if you like) who will have contributed. You may get recognition for being a thought leader in this matter in your own community and perhaps be able to create meaningful economic opportunities from that. If you’re in it for the money, I think it’s only fair to say that it’s far from sure the book will generate any kind of income. I’m not saying it won’t but it seems to be unlikely at the moment.

If you’d like to have a peek at the first chapter you can find it here:

OK, I’m really excited to get started on our project!

All love and blessings,


What happens when….


Have you ever wondered what happens when we fail to see what wants to manifest in our lives? When we don’t connect to the natural flow that results when we use our talents in the way they are supposed to be used? Or perhaps better: want to be used? When we don’t live the life that we are called to?

To be honest with you I wonder about this a lot and I would be the last to confess that I haven’t been struggling with that myself during various phases in my life.

In my work as coach I see this rather often. Well at least, the early stages. As you may know by now this has something to do with the stories that we have created about ourselves, the world (universe), how things take place there and how we relate to that. But not always. It may also be our context that prevents us from deploying our talents in flow, for instance as was the case with the German painter Emil Nolde. During World War II the Nazi’s forbid him to paint as his paintings didn’t fit their ideology. As a result from being deprived of the possibility to let his creativity flow freely he fell seriously sick and he created a possibility to continue his painting albeit at a smaller scale and of course he had to do so covertly. So he found a way to continue living the life he was called to. But what happens when our stories become so strong that they block that flow? When we block ourselves from seeing our calling? When we no longer see it’s just stories we’re telling ourselves?

One of the first things I observe is blaming the environment and when that doesn’t help people start turning grumpy, cynical, sarcastic and eventually they grow sick. In his development journey, Peter Woudenberg ( bumps into a former colleague which seems to fit this picture. Have a read:

They opted for a simple meal in the restaurant of one of the department stores in the city centre. Just as Peter was settling the bill he heard someone call his name.

“Peter. Peter Woudenberg, is that you?”

He turned around and recognised Patrick Lawson, a former finance manager at AU in Amsterdam. He only worked with him on one or two projects and there he had not been too impressed by Patrick’s contribution. Peter knew Patrick had been thrown out because of his lacking performance.

“Patrick! Good to see you! How are you doing?”

“Good to see you too,” Patrick said, then coughed and came up with a question that sounded more like a statement.

“So they got rid of you too, right?”

Peter felt unpleasantly touched by Patrick’s opening.

“Well, if you want to put it like that: yes, I no longer work for the company,” Peter said noticing the grumpy and disappointed, harsh cynical looks in Patrick’s face.

He studied Patrick’s appearance a bit more and noted that he had essentially become scruffy. He stood with his back bent, had his shoulders hanging and the clothes he was wearing looked anything but crisp.

“Yeah well, I call it getting rid of people. That’s what they do. Bastards, that’s what they all are,” Patrick commented.

“Not all of them are, you know that too, don’t you?”

“All of them,” Patrick said with a bit more vigour and coughed again. “They’re all covering their asses. Cowards, that’s what they are.”

Peter tried to change the topic.

“What are you doing these days?”

“Not much,” was Patrick’s answer filled with cynicism. “I tried to find a new job by myself but I’m too old. It’s true, once you’re over 50, you’re too old. And I’m 56, so…… They don’t need you anymore. Yeah, for some underpaid work for which I’m way too overqualified, perhaps. And by the way, it’s the same everywhere. Everyone is trying to cover their ass, sucking up to their boss and kicking down to their staff. They all squeeze the life out of people.”

“Why don’t you ask for help?” Peter tried.

“Whom from? Outplacement companies? I don’t have that kind of money,” he moaned while making a rejecting gesture with his arm. “They charge you god knows how much and still nothing is guaranteed. You know that I was only on a very average salary and my package wasn’t so great that I can retire. Most of it is gone anyway. No, it’s sad but clear. I’m simply too old,” Patrick said and coughed again making an awfully rasping sound.

Peter wondered if Patrick had started smoking the way he coughed. And he thought that Patrick had been grossly overpaid but apparently the latter’s self-image was that it was an insult, the kind of money AU had paid him. Peter also felt the heavy, downward spiralling energy Patrick had around him and registered how it was starting to get him down as well.

“What would you need to change in order to find an appropriate job?” Peter tried once more to change Patrick’s mood.

Patrick gave him a dark look and a sarcastic smile.

“Ha! Change my age? No, there’s nothing I can change. I wouldn’t know what. I mean, what should I change when the jobs are just not there? Doesn’t make any sense, does it? And I’m not in these networks of high-ranking guys like you are. But anyway, I need to go as I’m meeting my wife in a bar nearby. She would collect my pills at the pharmacist’s. I got lung problems, you see? I can hardly breathe sometimes. But, hey, it was nice meeting you, Peter, “ he said and attempted to put a smile on his face.

“Take good care of yourself,” Peter said as they shook hands.

How does this look on your end? Do you see any of the signs of not living the life you’re called to? Do you see those with people around you? What would be possible to get closer to that life? Wanna talk about that?



Success: show me the money


Success is mostly defined in terms of having material possessions. Or, to put it in other words: having the money to acquire those as money is undifferentiated purchasing power as my long ago economics teacher Jef van Caldenborgh would have it. And this kind of success seems to be the only one that matters. At least to us in the western world.

But is that really true?

Working as a coach I’ve met dozens of people who were really well off but somehow lacked a sense of fulfillment. They have asked me what they needed to do with their lives in order to experience this fulfillment again. Now, I’m not preaching to let go of all material comfort and retreat to some faraway desert or on some high mountain top. But on the other hand: those clients of mine defined themselves as being stuck in the money game. They saw no way out because of what they thought they would need to give up. They would define success as having money. Lots of it. Or holding some kind of high ranking job in some organisation (with matching remuneration of course).

In my novel “The Glass Dome” ( ) the main character is not really an exception to this, although there is something on the back burner coming alive again after he is trying to rescue this integration project for his employer. Although he meets a number of people who share their life experiences with him, he doesn’t see how his original beliefs are hindering him from seeing and subsequently embracing the life he’s called to.

The people he meets and who have done so  are involved in varying occupations: amongst other they are a carpenter, a cleaner, a monk and a catholic priest. Let me share you two examples of Peter being confronted with beliefs he wasn’t aware of he had those and how they impacted him.

First there’s this unfortunate encounter with Kevin who is a cleaner at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport. One morning when Peter is rushing to the gate for his flight to Nice in France he runs into Kevin and his cart. Chaos big time. From this event and from Peter trying to make some conversation out of politeness an unexpected yet interesting conversation follows:

“You’ve been doing this job since long?” Peter asked to make some conversation.

“About five years,” Kevin replied.

“You like it? I mean, on normal days when you don’t get bumped into by hurried passengers at full speed?”

“Yes, I like it,” he said slowly nodding his head again.

Kevin looked at Peter who didn’t know what to say to that. He showed his big white smile again.

“That’s great,” was Peter’s superficial comment.

“Well, I know what you must be thinking. What kind of fulfilment can a guy get from cleaning the floors and bathrooms in a wing of a giant public space, right?”

Peter felt totally embarrassed and didn’t know what to say.

“I choose to create a space that can make the travellers feel better when they pass through it. Well in any case not worse, if they notice it at all.” He burst out laughing, loudly and Peter noticed a few people turning their heads at them as they passed them by.

“So you don’t care what people think of your work?” Peter asked.

“Nope, I don’t. I do this work for myself. Just for myself,” was the unexpected answer from the cleaner. “And there’s nothing else I’d rather do,” he added.

Peter thought about how to politely end this conversation and move on to his gate when Kevin asked a direct question, adding to Peter’s embarrassment.

“I know you find this difficult to believe, right?”

That hit home.

“Well, no, not really,” Peter replied courteously not being able to hide his discomfort with the situation. Not only did he find it difficult to believe, he didn’t believe it at all. Although, there was something about the way in which Kevin spoke. He badly wanted to go to his gate but hesitated, triggered somehow by the tone of the cleaner’s words. Not that he expected to get his moment of enlightenment here but he was fascinated enough to being prevented from moving on.

“I know that what I’m doing is what I’m called to do and that gives a deep sense of fulfilment to me. There’s nobody’s approval I’m depending on. Ignorance doesn’t hurt me. I’m doing this work for myself and I get rewarded by it every minute.”

The word ‘called’ got Peter’s attention.

“Can I ask you what it is that you feel called to?” he asked.

“It’s about making my part of the world a bit cleaner. No one likes to live in dirt. Nothing high can live in a scruffy environment. Being in a clean space allows for different thoughts, gives different possibilities and, honestly, I consider those better than those emerging from dirt.”

Kevin paused for a bit while seemingly studying Peter.

“What kind of work do you do? Do you like it? You look to me as a high-placed person. A VIP! You could be someone who is running a company. Maybe a huge company with offices all over the world.” As he said this, his right hand drew a wide circle to underline how big that would be.

“I couldn’t do that and hence don’t want to. I don’t think I have the talents for it and, more importantly, I would not be doing what I want to be doing.”

This now had turned into another clear confrontation for Peter. A confrontation with what he had actually always thought about people not making it to the highest ranks. He had heard it before that they would say that they were happy with the lives they had but clearly Peter never believed that. Probably many said they were happy but essentially were not. And for the others who were, Peter had never been able to hear that. But the importance of doing what you are supposed to do and be happy with that, no matter what, had just become very clear to him. Series of colleagues, former colleagues, friends flashed through his mind and he could see them all forcing themselves to adapt to something they think others expect of them. With deep dissatisfaction, bitterness, cynicism, disappointment as the unavoidable end result. He thought about Karen for a moment as she too seemed to fit this picture. It is about doing what’s meaningful to you. Not about what you think is meaningful to others and hope that this would make you look good when you start doing that. Neither is it about doing something big for the sake of its supposed grandness. The cleaner had made clear to him that it’s about what’s meaningful to you.


Here’s another excerpt from the original text: In the conversation on new year’s eve with the catholic priest Père Jean that I mentioned in my previous blog, Peter tries to be empathetic to what Jean says about how he sees the essence of religion. obviously he understands that Jean’s beliefs and consequent practices don’t make him an ideal candidate for climbing the organisation’s ladder. But Peter doesn’t see that this is his set of beliefs he is projecting on Jean’s life. It is him who comes from his corporate set of beliefs where success means: moving up the ladder

“I guess that makes clear why you did not make a splendid career within in the church,” Peter was too quick to comment.

“When you mean with career ‘moving up the ladder’, my life has been a total failure,” he [Jean] looked at Peter and burst out laughing.

Their glasses refilled, they toasted again while Jean was still laughing.

“When you mean with career ‘living what you’re called to be’, it’s a tremendous success and I wouldn’t change it for anything in the world. Besides I have the privilege of working with young talented managers from all over the world as I’m a visiting professor at a business school nearby as well.”


“I understand my viewpoints may sound conflicting with the laws and rules of the church as you may have come to know them. In that respect it’s no different from working for a company. If you don’t share the same attitude and beliefs, you’re no longer part of the inner circle and your career won’t advance. I’m sure you know about this yourself.”

How about you? Where are you in the process of recognising your beliefs and how they either serve you or block you from having a more meaningful life? Let me know what you think! If you like, I’m happy to share how this process took place on my end (and still is taking place for that matter).